Posted on 16 Comments

Cleaning Vinyl Records with Household Products: Effective or Ineffective?

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In today’s video, I’m going to show you how I clean my vinyl records by hand using everyday household products that we all have in our home. And then in an upcoming video, I’ll show you how you can go about cleaning your records using a record cleaning machine like the Okki Nokki!

Can you effectively clean vinyl records with household products, like soap, water and microfiber rags? And is it easy to do or is it very time consuming?

Well, check out today’s video to find out!

Also, if you enjoyed this video, please hit the “like” button down below. And make sure you Subscribe to my Devoted to Vinyl channel so you can be one of the first people to know when a new video drops!

And lastly, don’t forget to voice your thoughts down below in the comments section, as well!

Intro Music: Far Away (Sting) by MK2
Background Music: Erykah by Otis McDonald
Outtakes Music: Behind Closed Doors by Otis McDonald

 

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16 thoughts on “Cleaning Vinyl Records with Household Products: Effective or Ineffective?

  1. The only helpful man out here on this topic and heโ€™s like the 8th google result

    1. Thanks ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿฟ

  2. Is it bad to use water to clean it?

    1. Devoted to Vinyl thank you very much I really appreciate your help!!

    2. Well, distilled water should be part of the cleaning regimen. I wouldn’t recommend just pouring water on the record in an attempt to clean it, though.

  3. How much distilled water do you use in the solutions? Is it a water bottle full? Trying to get the exact ratios so I can go purchase everything I need to clean my records today.

    1. I would say that a majority of the bottle is distilled water, yes. Thanks for the question.

  4. Thanks dude, the Sam Cooke is a sign of credibility. Star Trek uniform is touch of home video genius. I will definitely try this.

    1. Thanks ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿฟ. Let me know how it goes for you.

  5. From the 60’s through the 90’s a little brush that clipped onto the cartridge served me very well. Then I raised some kids and put all that stuff into storage. But I kept buying vinyl. When I finally got my stuff out again, not everything worked right. So I just replaced my stereo right before Covid 19 got here. I don’t have a brush and I don’t know if they’re still available. Everyone used to advise against them. But in the 60’s I gave my records the kind of care you’d expect from a preteen and they still play and sound great. They’ll certainly outlive me. I won’t play any of these used records I bought without cleaning them, but for maintenance, I want a clip-on brush. Do you know if they’re still around? I won’t be looking or buying anything for a while.

  6. I use a Knosti Antistat machine with my own solution, similar to yours but not rubbing alcohol but Etanol instead. Works great.

  7. There’s one problem with your method. I noticed you did not do a rinse with distilled water. It’s very important to do a rinse because if you use dish soap and alcohol but don’t rinse it off, the soap will still be in the grooves and your records will sound even worse than before. Although the solution is almost all distilled water, even the smallest amount of alcohol or soap has to be removed with a rinse.

    1. I would also do a wipe with straight alcohol afterwards, that way more oils and soap contaminates are removed.

    2. I agree with you. His technique is good but I wouldn’t put any soap in it. Water and alcohol is enough.

    3. @Devoted to Vinyl I agree with him concerning the need to rinse off your records after cleaning them.
      My record cleaning regimen is similar to yours, except I don’t use alcohol. I have found after a significant amount of time and many records that clear dish soap on a sponge is adequate to clean the records. I then use the microfiber cloth after washing them to dry and get into the grooves. Then finally, I dry them with a towel. I know that you and others like to let them air dry; however, in my experience, drying them with both a microfiber and plain cloth doesn’t scuff or scratch the records, as long as you are doing it in a circular motion. That’s the key to keep from damaging your records–cleaning them in a circular motion each and every time will cause extremely little or virtually no damage to your records.

    4. Interesting. To be quite honest, Iโ€™ve washed countless records using this method, and they always sound great afterwards. But itโ€™s something Iโ€™ll keep in mind. Thanks for sharing.

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