Posted on 10 Comments

Oxford dictionary | 3. Personal Hygiene | Oxford picture dictionary 2nd edition

Welcome to the Oxford Picture Dictionary channel. Subscribe to our channel to receive updates on all our latest videos.This video is designed for students, teachers and anyone wanting to learn English.
List lesson in playlist:
1. The Body

2. Inside and Outside the Body

3. Personal Hygiene

4. Symptoms and Injuries

5. Illnesses and Medical Conditions

6. A Pharmacy

7. Taking Care of Your Health

8. Medical Emergencies

9. First Aid

10. Medical Care

11. Dental Care

12. Hospital
13. A Health Fair

More 100 videos for all category.
1. Everyday Language

2. People

3. Housing

4. Food

5. Clothing

6. Health

7. Community

8. Transportation

9. Work

10. Areas of Study

11. Plants and Animals

12. Recreation

Please click subscribe for more videos

Thank you for your kind support 🙂

Posted on 190 Comments

English Vocabulary: House Cleaning


Your house is a mess! I’m going to help you to clean it… in English! In this lesson, you’ll learn some common house cleaning verbs and nouns, like “sweep”, “mop”, “clean”, “wipe”, “vacuum”, “scrub”, “broom”, and “cloth”. This is an easy lesson that will help you talk about your daily chores in English.

TAKE THE QUIZ:

TRANSCRIPT

[Whistling] Oh, hey, guys. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on “House Cleaning Vocabulary”. So, most of us, we have to deal with house cleaning. Cleaning our homes is one of the most basic things that we do on our weekends or during the week. So, let’s look at some common verbs, as well as some common nouns that you can use to talk about house cleaning.

Number one, obviously the most basic verb, is: “clean”. So, you can use the verb “clean” to talk about anything. You can clean the floor, clean the window, clean a wall, clean a table, clean a chair. That’s all you need to know about the verb “clean”.

Next, we have the verb: “sweep”. So: “Sweep the floor with a broom.” Does anyone know what a broom is? That’s right. This is a broom. Okay? And sweeping is the action of doing this. So, you sweep the floor with a broom. Okay?

Now, once you sweep the floor, you might want to, you know, clean it a little more maybe with some water and some soap. And if you want to clean the floor with some water and some soap, what you are doing is you’re probably mopping the floor with a mop. Now, I don’t have a mop with me today, but it’s best to think of a mop as like a broom with a wet part at the end. So, mopping, you’re going whoosh, whoosh, whoosh, whoosh. You’re mopping the floor with a mop. The verb and the noun are the exact same thing.

Next up, we have “vacuum”. Now, what is a vacuum? Let me show you. There we have a vacuum. And it’s similar to “mop” where the verb and the noun are the exact same thing. So, you can vacuum with a vacuum, just like you can mop with a mop. All right?

Next, we have the verb: “wipe”. And “wipe” can be used in many contexts as well. So, if I have let’s say… Let’s imagine this is a piece of cloth. I can wipe off the table with a cloth, for example. Or you… I can wipe off the board if it’s dirty. So, “to wipe” is this action. Okay? And, again, you can use the preposition “off” as a phrasal verb, so you can wipe off a table or wipe off a board, for example.

Next, we have the verb: “scrub”. Now, “scrub” is very often used when you’re cleaning, you know, your bathroom, or the bathtub, or the walls in your bathroom. And if you have tiles, which are, again, the square pieces like in a bathroom, you can scrub them. Okay? And normally, what you need is a brush to scrub, not a toothbrush, but, you know, a cleaning brush or what you can call a scrubbing pad. So, to really get that hard clean, to scrub stuff around your toilet, or around your bathtub, or around the walls in your bathroom. Okay?

And finally, you can use the word: “Dust (or dust off) the table with a duster.” Now, “dust” is something which accumulates over time on tables, on pretty much anything. Imagine it as being the little particles that build up over time if you don’t touch something. So, if you can [do this to a book or to a table, you will see dust flying off of it, and you need a duster to dust off the dust. Okay?

So, to review, the most common verb you can use in house cleaning is “clean”. You can sweep the floor with a broom. You can mop the floor with a mop. You can vacuum the floor or the carpet with a vacuum. You can wipe a table with a cloth. And you can scrub tiles with a brush or a scrub pad. And you can also dust a table with a duster.

If you’d like to test your understanding of this vocabulary, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com. And don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel. Back to work.

Posted on 117 Comments

Learn basic English vocabulary for cleaning your house


In today’s English lesson, I will teach you how to clean in English! You will learn vocabulary and special verbs we use to talk about cleaning. You’ll learn verbs like “wipe”, “sweep”, “wash”, “scrub”, “mop”, and more. This lesson is for beginners, so don’t be scared. Take the quiz on engVid.com and keep your house clean.

TRANSCRIPT

Hi, guys. Welcome to EngVid. I just want to say to you that I have the power. Anybody who watched He-Man will remember this. And if not, oh, well. I’ve got a lesson for you today, and it’s on cleaning. This, my friend, is a vacuum cleaner. Look at it. Elegant lines. [Spits] A little dirty, but we’ll clean that up in a second or two when we start the video. This is on a basic lesson for cleaning. There’s another video you should check out. It gives more phrases you can use with cleaning. Right? You will like that one, too. But anyway, let’s get moving, right?

There we are, over here. Mr. E. Oh, no. He has spilled something. “Spill” — what is “spilling”? A “spill” is when you have, you know, a liquid, and you drop it on the floor, and it goes everywhere. Sometimes, you can spill things like rice, sugar, or salt because they’re uncountable and they go everywhere like a liquid. “He has spilled his tea.” The cleaner isn’t happy. But I don’t think he’s using the right tool for this job. Do you? Do you know what this is called? Do you know what he should use? By the end of this lesson, you’re going to know that and a few handy phrases to show you are a native English speaker, yeah?

All right. So what’s happening in the picture? My friend is cleaning up the spill. But I think he’s using the wrong tool. Booyah! “Wipe.” The first thing we want to talk about is “wipe”. What is “to wipe”? Well, when you “wipe” something, you take a paper or a rag — you know cloth. Or — cloth, rag, paper. These are the things we use to wipe. It’s a soft movement where you just kind of do this motion or this to clean something. Okay?

Now, we wipe tables, and we wipe walls to clean them. Right? So when something’s not serious, you can wipe it. It will go away easily. Right? Unlike my last girlfriend. Anyway.

“Wash”, “wash”, what is “washing”? Well, you should wash your hands, right, to get them clean. But we also need to wash other things. One of the things we wash is after you eat your food, you have your knife and your fork, right, and a plate. You put them in water. All right? See our little water here? This is a sink. That’s where you put them, by the way. Did you know they’re called “sink”? This is called a “sink”. You put your dishes in the sink, and you wash them. Okay?

So we’ve got our sink. We also wash our clothes. You’re clean, right? I’m sure you don’t wear the same clothes all the time. You take them off. You put them in the machine. We call that a “washing machine”. Okay? So “wash” — you “wash” dishes; you “wash” your clothes. And that’s what we’ve got here. Another word for “clothes” by the way, boys and girls, “laundry”. A lot of times, we don’t say, “I’m washing my clothes.” In fact, we mostly say, “I’m doing my laundry”, but we’ll come back to that. Okay? So you’ve got “laundry” to wash.

Now, “scrubbing” — “scrub”. “Scrub” — I’m missing something here. Oops. Pardon me. You scrub, and it’s hard. Remember I said when you use a cloth, you use it for soft? “Scrubbing” is when you want to go really, really hard on something because it’s hard to clean. Now, what do we scrub? We scrub floors. Okay? You have dirt on the floor. You have to get down there and scrub it. You scrub your sink because remember, you’ve been washing things. You need to scrub to get the dirt out. It won’t come out with a wipe. Okay? There’s a lot of dirt there. Please, oh, please, tell me you scrub your toilet. Don’t wipe your toilet, okay? You know what you use it for, so you need to scrub that thing clean. Okay? Or don’t invite me to your house. Some of you have, but I noticed you only wipe your toilets. I’m not coming. Change that attitude — change your behavior, I’ll be there. Okay? And walls. Walls get dirty. People throw things; food goes on the wall. Especially if you have babies, it goes up on the wall. You need to scrub it because it goes into the paint. Okay?

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Live Update

Global Total
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Affected Countries

Total in USA
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

Asia
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

North America
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

South America
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

Europe
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

Africa
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million

Oceania
Last update on:
Cases

Deaths

Recovered

Active

Cases Today

Deaths Today

Critical

Cases Per Million