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Vitamin Labels Are Wrong – Know Your Nutritional Requirements

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The “Daily Values” (DVs) on vitamin labels are currently wrong on many supplements and the FDA has delayed updates until 2020. Until then, learn your requirements for vitamins and minerals using the free tables at . In this video, ConsumerLab’s Tod Cooperman, M.D. explains the problem and how you can figure out the proper dose you may need for nutrients such as vitamins B6 and B12, folate, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K and minerals like calcium, magnesium, potassium, and iron.

Since 1999, ConsumerLab.com been independently testing dieting supplements and reporting its findings. ConsumerLab.com is also the only third-party verification group that freely publishes its testing methods and quality criteria/standards. Visit to become a member today.

#RDA #vitamindosage #recommendeddailyallowance

 

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8 thoughts on “Vitamin Labels Are Wrong – Know Your Nutritional Requirements

  1. I just want a good brand name of vitamins.

  2. Some vitamins and minerals in a multivitamin are chemical derived. Others are plant/food-based. The difference, as far as I can judge based on a little research (googling it), is like black and white: plant-based – very good and digestible and ‘natural’; chemical-based – not good, less digestible, not natural. However, neither your site, this video, nor your employee whom I contacted by email, appears to mention/know anything about this plant/chemical difference. Why?

    1. Actually, we have extensive information on this topic, Nick, and the answer is not black and white — it depends on the nutrient. See the following:

  3. I am now more skeptical after you said this..
    If most of the vitamin supplements have inaccurate labels then how do I buy a supplement ??
    Are there some indicators which a regular consumer can use to buy a supplement which is pure ??

    1. Hi Vira – If you are a member of ConsumerLab, you can see our results for purity and accuracy of labels for the products reviewed (tested) on our site (well over 1,000). If you are not a member and you just want to know whether a label is conforming to the new DVs or the old ones, you can contact that company and they should be able to tell you.

  4. The film makes the valid point that label DVs can be out of date. However, what is not mentioned is that even updated DVs can mislead. The biggest example applies to iron. The DV estimation uses a % iron absorption that assumes a good deal of the iron is coming from heme iron (a kind of iron found in beef, pork, chicken etc). No supplemental or fortification forms of iron come close to the % absorption of heme iron. Thus, the % DV for iron from a supplement or fortified food will be misleadingly high.
    Dr. Robert DiSilvestro, Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Professor Emeritus, Human Nutrition, Ohio State University

  5. So glad you are addressing this!

    1. Thanks. Many people have no idea that this problem exists.

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